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woodpecker tools

#273642 by Hobbyman2 » Wed Aug 26, 2020 4:57 pm

I have been looking into the line of layout tools they have but I just can't seem to wrap my head around the price. for years I have made my own angle gauges and even squares and dividers , if they wear out they get used for something else or into the stove they go , lately I have been considering taking the plunge on something that will out last me lol , if nothing else they would look good hanging on the wall :) !! I am sure there are folks here who have them and would like to hear fed back on pro's and cons if ya have time , I am looking into the marking gauges , small to medium squares , and a ruler or 2 , I have seen the small layout squares that and gauges have the layout holes for for a pencil and do not think I could duplicate their accuracy . any comments positive or not are welcome .

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Hobbyman2 Favorite Quote: "If a man does his best, what else is there?"
- General George S. Patton (1885-1945)

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273644 by reible » Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:14 pm

I have yet to own a woodpecker tool that I did not like.

No I can't own them all but I have budgeted a couple $$ each year for some one or two of them. This year was the exception as I had fewer $ and more things on the list. So far they have not tempted me into reassigning money this year and they might not this year but I expect to have some money set aside for items next year.

Their one time tools are hard to budget for since you don't know what they might have in any given year. Sometimes they do have another run of a tool but it might be a while before that happens so you are better off getting tools you really want when they announce them.

Ed

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{Knight of the Shopsmith} [Hero's don't wear capes, they wear dog tags]

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273645 by RFGuy » Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:30 pm

Everyone has their own tool preferences, so take my comments with a grain of salt...I own a few Woodpeckers tools and like all of them. It is hard to get over the price, but if you are strategic with your purchases you can usually buy the item you want on sale. Granted, Woodpeckers doesn't give more than a small discount typically, but every bit of savings counts. By far, the one tool from Woodpeckers that I use the most is their 12" aluminum square. Prior to this, I heavily used the stainless 6" square that I got when I purchased my Mark V new. That square just sits in a drawer now because I love the heft and feel of the Woodpeckers 12" square (model # 1281). It just has the right balance in my hand so it is a joy to use. Only negative (in my mind) with this square is the blade of the square is a bit thick because of the aluminum design. I have never had a problem with it, but for some they don't like the potential marking error of sighting down from this thick blade to the work surface. As an alternative, they do offer stainless blade squares and even have the squares with indents for a pencil to fit in (similar to Incra rulers), e.g. to mark parallel edges. Personally I have never liked those Incra style rulers with multiple measurement indents, but that is just me. I also have the 18" & 26" squares set from Woodpeckers (on sale right now from Woodpeckers - http://e.woodpeck.com/public/previewmessage/email/34643/1686691/html). I finally switched over to cutting plywood using a tracksaw this year and I don't have all of the track accessories that I want for it just yet. Until then, I have been using my 26" square often with my track to get perfectly square cuts. I find the Woodpeckers 26" square to be a great companion for my tracksaw tracks.

Not a tool, but a jig from them that I have is their hole boring jig. I just finished my new assembly/worktable top with 20mm dog holes using this jig and it worked great. Initial testing so far seems to indicate that the dog holes are square enough to suit my needs.

Unfortunately some items from Woodpeckers are ONETIME tool purchases so if you miss the sale window then you have to wait for them to resurrect that tool again to order it. Other than Woodpecker's pricing, this is the next most annoying thing for them IMHO. Bottomline, Woodpeckers makes high quality tools...often they are filling a niche with certain tools, but they fill that niche very, very nicely.
Last edited by RFGuy on Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:41 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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📶RF Guy

Mark V 520 (Bought New '98) | 4" jointer | 6" beltsander | 12" planer | bandsaw | router table | speed reducer | univ. tool rest
Porter Cable 12" Compound Miter Saw | Rikon 8" Low Speed Bench Grinder w/CBN wheels | Jessem Clear-Cut TS™ Stock Guides
Festool (Emerald): DF 500 Q | RO 150 FEQ | OF 1400 EQ | TS 55 REQ | CT 26 E
DC3300 | Shopvac w/ClearVue CV06 Mini Cyclone | JDS AirTech 2000 | Sundstrom PAPR | Dylos DC1100 Pro particulate monitor

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273646 by jsburger » Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:36 pm

As Ed said, I have yet to own a woodpecker tool that I did not like. Yes they are pricey but they are made 100% in house in the US on state of the art milling machines and laser engravers. If you ever hold one in your hand the quality is absolutely wonderful. They also have some unique items and old standbys with unique features added.

They are truly in a class by them selves.

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273647 by Erik » Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:44 pm

Like Ed, I have not found a Woodpecker tool that I do not like. A couple of years ago I decided that my layout tools were not up to scratch and so have been systematically upgrading them ever since. My first purchase in 2018 was the 12" Angle Square with angle reference plate. An unbelievably accurate and indispensable tool I used when building a deck. In 2019 I picked up a set of their Precision Squares (12" and 18") that I use all the time, especially when aligning equipment or marking large pieces. Earlier this year I purchased their 8" Saddle Square which is my go-to square for marking (I really like the way it wraps around the edge of the board). And just a couple of months ago I order their one-time-tool 6" Carpenter's Square that should ship in September. Having accurate and well-engineered layout tools has definitely improved my joinery. It's also made layout a lot easier.

In my view the Woodpecker tools are well engineered and beautifully constructed. If you can discipline yourself to one or two purchases a year you won't be sorry.

-Erik

SHOPSMITH TOOLS
1990 Mark V upgraded to 520 in 2007 (originally a 510 purchased in 1992 at a garage sale)
.......Incra V120 Miter Gauge, TS Sharkguard, Jessem TS hold downs
.......TS Cross-Cut Sled (Nick Ferry Design), Bandsaw Circle Cutter (Inspire Woodcraft Design)
1993 4" Jointer
1996 11" Bandsaw (upgraded thrust bearings and installed Carter guides in 2020)
2019 6" Beltsander

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273649 by BuckeyeDennis » Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:03 pm

I have a few of them, and all are top quality. Their accuracy is comparable to some vintage Starrett layout tools that I own. But with the bodies of the Woodpeckers tools typically being aluminum, they're not as rugged. That doesn't bother me personally, though, because I always handle my tools with care, and no one else uses them.

If I shop for a square at a big box store, I always have to test a bunch of them in order to find an accurate one -- and often I cant find a single good one. For example, I was recently trying to buy a good speed square. Most of the pretty anodized aluminum ones were accurate on the 90-degree angle, but they were all off considerably on the 45-degree angle. And the plastic ones don't even have good straight edges. But my little Woodpeckers Delve square is dead on, so I still use it even when I'd prefer a larger speed square.

Rulers have similar issues -- the ends usually aren't aligned precisely with the scale, even if the scale is accurate. A stainless steel meter stick that I bought at Woodcraft, and wasn't particularly cheap, didn't even have parallel sides -- the danged thing had a taper to it. So I invested in one from Woodpeckers, and have never regretted it. All my Woodpeckers measuring tools are accurate to within the limits of my testing capabilities, in every dimension.

Being made in the USA, and subject to serious quality control, they're bound to be substantially more expensive than your typical Chinese import stuff. But time is money, and you can waste a lot of time if you rely on inaccurate measurement tools. I've finally acquired enough vintage Starrett & Lufkin tools, complemented by a few Woodpeckers tools bought new, to make almost any measurement I need. My big-box measuring tools now get used for rough work only.

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273654 by jsburger » Wed Aug 26, 2020 7:53 pm

BuckeyeDennis wrote:I have a few of them, and all are top quality. Their accuracy is comparable to some vintage Starrett layout tools that I own. But with the bodies of the Woodpeckers tools typically being aluminum, they're not as rugged. That doesn't bother me personally, though, because I always handle my tools with care, and no one else uses them.

If I shop for a square at a big box store, I always have to test a bunch of them in order to find an accurate one -- and often I cant find a single good one. For example, I was recently trying to buy a good speed square. Most of the pretty anodized aluminum ones were accurate on the 90-degree angle, but they were all off considerably on the 45-degree angle. And the plastic ones don't even have good straight edges. But my little Woodpeckers Delve square is dead on, so I still use it even when I'd prefer a larger speed square.

Rulers have similar issues -- the ends usually aren't aligned precisely with the scale, even if the scale is accurate. A stainless steel meter stick that I bought at Woodcraft, and wasn't particularly cheap, didn't even have parallel sides -- the danged thing had a taper to it. So I invested in one from Woodpeckers, and have never regretted it. All my Woodpeckers measuring tools are accurate to within the limits of my testing capabilities, in every dimension.

Being made in the USA, and subject to serious quality control, they're bound to be substantially more expensive than your typical Chinese import stuff. But time is money, and you can waste a lot of time if you rely on inaccurate measurement tools. I've finally acquired enough vintage Starrett & Lufkin tools, complemented by a few Woodpeckers tools bought new, to make almost any measurement I need. My big-box measuring tools now get used for rough work only.


Woodpeckers tools are in the same league as Starrett & Lufkin. That is why they are expensive. They are worth every penny you spend on them.

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273661 by RFGuy » Wed Aug 26, 2020 9:33 pm

BuckeyeDennis wrote:I have a few of them, and all are top quality. Their accuracy is comparable to some vintage Starrett layout tools that I own.
...

I've finally acquired enough vintage Starrett & Lufkin tools, complemented by a few Woodpeckers tools bought new, to make almost any measurement I need. My big-box measuring tools now get used for rough work only.

Dennis,

Thanks. Are vintage Starrett and Lufkin tools really that much better, i.e. more accurate than newer ones? What "era" is considered vintage for these brands? I am just asking out of curiosity. I love both brands and have a few of their tools, but I doubt any of them are considered "vintage". I have no complaints with any of the ones that I own (new or old)...though I have never questioned/tested their accuracy. I do know that Lufkin is now under the umbrella of Crescent tools company (another favorite tool company of mine), but unfortunately I do know many products from Crescent tools are now made overseas so I have seen some complaints online regarding their quality changes.

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📶RF Guy

Mark V 520 (Bought New '98) | 4" jointer | 6" beltsander | 12" planer | bandsaw | router table | speed reducer | univ. tool rest
Porter Cable 12" Compound Miter Saw | Rikon 8" Low Speed Bench Grinder w/CBN wheels | Jessem Clear-Cut TS™ Stock Guides
Festool (Emerald): DF 500 Q | RO 150 FEQ | OF 1400 EQ | TS 55 REQ | CT 26 E
DC3300 | Shopvac w/ClearVue CV06 Mini Cyclone | JDS AirTech 2000 | Sundstrom PAPR | Dylos DC1100 Pro particulate monitor

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273663 by cham-ed » Wed Aug 26, 2020 9:44 pm

I have a Lutkin combination square that I inherited from my uncle. He bought it before WWII. and it is still dead on. But you can pick up a cheap one for $10 bucks but it isn't good when it is new. Much less in 80 years.

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Re: woodpecker tools

#273664 by jsburger » Wed Aug 26, 2020 9:46 pm

RFGuy wrote:
BuckeyeDennis wrote:I have a few of them, and all are top quality. Their accuracy is comparable to some vintage Starrett layout tools that I own.
...

I've finally acquired enough vintage Starrett & Lufkin tools, complemented by a few Woodpeckers tools bought new, to make almost any measurement I need. My big-box measuring tools now get used for rough work only.

Are vintage Starrett and Lufkin tools really that much better, i.e. more accurate than newer ones? What "era" is considered vintage for these brands? I am just asking out of curiosity. I love both brands and have a few of their tools, but I doubt any of them are considered "vintage". I have no complaints with any of the ones that I own...though I have never questioned/tested their accuracy. I do know that Lufkin is now under the umbrella of Crescent tools company (another favorite tool company of mine), but unfortunately I do know many products from Crescent tools are now made overseas so I have seen some complaints online regarding their quality changes.


I don't think "vintage" Starrett has anything to do with it. Their tools today are still top quality. We used them all the time when I worked for the Air Force in aircraft generator repair. Starrette and Woodpeckers prices are pretty comparable.

---

John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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