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Band Saw tires

#290 by jsburger » Sat Aug 05, 2006 3:00 pm

I have purchased the urathane band saw tires for my SS band saw. What is the best way to remove the old tires?

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John & Mary Burger
Eagle's Lair Woodshop
Hooper, UT

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My way.....

#291 by chiroindixon » Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:15 am

I did it several months ago. Like getting the old sandpaper off a sanding disc, I put the wheels in an oven set at 200F for 30 minutes.

Then with gloves, remove and clamp wheel in a vise. A sharp chisel wielded carefully, took the old rubber off. Go slow and easy. The metal is soft.

Per "Jan" at Shopsmith, be sure to get ALL the old rubber off. I then cleaned wheels with mineral spirits. You might have to sand the small stubble off.

I wrestled the new tires on by myself. Having another hand would have helped. There was some cussin' because they are a tight fit.

It's worth the effort. Bandsaw runs and tracks much smoother....

Have fun...

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Bandsaw tires

#340 by Bill-Co » Mon Aug 14, 2006 9:50 pm

I also purchased new tires. I have had aproblem with the tires slipping off the wheels. Has anyone else had this problem? The wheels were clean with nothing left on them from the old tires.
Thanks for any help you can give.

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#402 by deathwish2 » Tue Aug 29, 2006 11:26 pm

Bill-Co wrote:I also purchased new tires. I have had aproblem with the tires slipping off the wheels. Has anyone else had this problem? The wheels were clean with nothing left on them from the old tires.
Thanks for any help you can give.


With Bicycle grips, the 'lubricant' used to slip them on is 'hairspray' . . . when it dries, it acts as a fixative . . . I do not see why that wouldn't work with BS tires.


However . . . Here is what Carter has to say about their tires . . .
http://www.carterproducts.com/support/UrethaneInstall.pdf
URETHANE BAND SAW TIRE INSTALLATION
Wheel Preparation:
1. Clean the work area of sawdust.
2. Clean the rim of the wheel using lacquer thinner or another solvent.
3. Finish prepping the wheel surface by removing any solvent residue with denatured alcohol leaving a clean smooth surface.
Urethane Tire Installation Instructions:
1. Submerge Urethane tire in a mixture of water and dish soap heated to at least 120 degree F for five minutes for easier installation.
2. Remove tires from soapy water and immediately slide them over the band saw wheel. CAUTION: Water and tire will be
extremely hot, use gloves to protect your hands.
3. Make sure tire is seated correctly on wheel and evenly distributed around the wheel to prevent an out of balance wheel.
4. Let tire cool completely without blade installed before running band saw.

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--Mark

When it comes to woodworking and buying tools,
I always think back to my grandfathers advice on golf . . .
"it's not the arrows, it's the Indian.''

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Urethane tires

#425 by burnsrk » Fri Sep 08, 2006 11:30 pm

I just put on a pair last week. I put them on about halfway around the wheel then used a couple of Irwin Quick Grip hand clamps to keep the tires from slipping off. I then was able to stretch them on the rest of the way without alot of effort. I just started at the clamps and stretched the tires onto the wheels as I moved away from them Since I didn't have to heat them, I was able to use the bandsaw immediately.

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Removing old tires

#477 by burnsrk » Tue Sep 19, 2006 7:23 pm

I used a wire brush wheel on a grinder to get the old tires off and thought it worked very well.

Kevin

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#489 by nimrod » Thu Sep 21, 2006 1:36 pm

burnsrk wrote:I used a wire brush wheel on a grinder to get the old tires off and thought it worked very well.

Kevin

Me too. I've removed 3 different sets of old tires, and never had a problem.

I use the corner of a screwdriver to peel/pry/pull the tire away from the wheel in one spot, then stick the screwdriver between the tire and wheel and gently roll it loose. The tires always come off in one piece, with a minimum amount of old glue left on the wheel.

I use automotive brake cleaner to dissolve the old glue, then finish/buff with the wire wheel.

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Goo Gone

#1346 by sconi » Wed Jan 03, 2007 6:43 pm

In addition to the methods mentioned previously - in particular careful scraping with a chisel; I found that a liberal application of Goo Gone helps a lot, first I made a cut across the face of the tire and pulled off as much as possible by hand, then pour on the goo gone, let it sit for 15 minuets or more, but not to the point of drying out, it makes removal much simpler, it did take a couple of applications to get it all done, use of an old toothbrush for final cleaning with mineral sprits worked fine too, be sure to wear eye protection to avoid any painful splashes from the toothbrush action.

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#1354 by paulmcohen » Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:22 pm

jsburger wrote:I have purchased the urathane band saw tires for my SS band saw. What is the best way to remove the old tires?


Hire your "son", it took mine about 3 hours, first pliers, then an Exacto knife and finally a Dremal tool with brass brush bit. He went through 4 brass brushes in the process.

I love the new tire:)

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#1360 by ericolson » Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:29 am

I put my new tires in the oven at 250 degress for five minutes. Just enough to heat them up and make them flexible and stretchy. Then I put the tires on the wheels fairly quickly. As the tires cool they contract and "lock" onto the wheel. Piece-o-cake! Just don't forget you've got urethane tires in the oven. Spouses, girlfriends, fiancees don't appreciate that very much.

Eric

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