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Re: Tricked-out overarm pin router

#229707 by delong94 » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:13 pm

delong94 wrote:Thank you. The brackets are there for the casters... I'll need to get some new casters later on. I plan to get the ratchets and collar too.


I picked up a used caster pair... $40 with free shipping... I'll have to clean them up and get the OPR set up soon. Not sure when, but I am taking this one day at a time. The collar and ratchet handles should be here this week too.

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Re: Tricked-out overarm pin router

#230172 by delong94 » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:07 pm

Finally started to clean up the OPR. Still a lot of rust on the support pole. I added the ratchet handles and soaked the caster bracelets in evaporust.

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Re: Tricked-out overarm pin router

#230173 by BuckeyeDennis » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:22 pm

delong94 wrote:
delong94 wrote:Thank you. The brackets are there for the casters... I'll need to get some new casters later on. I plan to get the ratchets and collar too.


I picked up a used caster pair... $40 with free shipping... I'll have to clean them up and get the OPR set up soon. Not sure when, but I am taking this one day at a time. The collar and ratchet handles should be here this week too.


I did make one other small mod to my OPR stand that you might want to consider. Mine came with the casters already installed. But the stand was not very rigid in the twist direction (about a vertical line through the router axis). I think this twistiness results from moving the side braces up higher to make room for the casters. Once you do that, there is no longer a complete perimeter frame anywhere except at the top.

Actually, when I got my OPR, the side braces were completely missing, and the stand was as loose as a goose. But after I picked up the rusty basket-case machine, I salvaged the side braces, cut them to the new length, and cleaned and painted them. On the donor machine, being too long to fit inside the legs, they had been bolted to the outside of the legs.

After I installed the "new" side braces, the stand was still pretty soft about that twist axis. So I added bolts that clamp the side braces firmly to the front middle brace. This does a good job of keeping those braces at right angles. I drilled new holes close to the inside edge of the braces, to give the bolts as much leverage as possible.

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My stand doesn't have a rear-middle brace, and I don't think that any of them did. After I learned that I still had a twist problem, I kicked myself for having discarded the front brace from the rusty donor machine, as it could have been repurposed. But the original front brace plus the two side braces, with the added bolts, makes a rigid C-frame. So the stand is pretty stiff now.

I just checked the manual, and the original casterless stand had bolts like this installed at all four corners of the bottom perimeter frame, through the existing slots you can see in the photo. But you lose those when you install the caster kit.

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