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15 posts 1 2

#70296 by pennview » Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:36 pm

The indexing wheel is a plastic material ([color="Red"]I'm not sure how well it will hold up long term[/color]). It is a commercial item I purchased from:
http://www.ironfirellc.com/shop/category.asp?catid=2


Given the possibility of damage to the index wheel during use, perhaps a method of locking the spindle when fluting, reeding, or drilling would alleviate any stress on the wheel. One solution would be to mound the sanding disk (or another disc mounted on a faceplate) on the rear spindle and build a block of sorts attached to tube ways so that one could use a quick clamp to clamp the sanding disk to the block and thereby immobilize the spindle.

I've seen a number of lathes with built-in indexing wheels that were damaged because the user failed to lock the spindle. It's best to unplug the machine as well so one doesn't accidentally turn it on with the index pin in place.

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Art in Western Pennsylvania

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#70311 by charlese » Fri Jul 02, 2010 6:43 pm

Just plain SUPER WORK, Ed!:D Wow!

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Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#70313 by nuhobby » Fri Jul 02, 2010 6:54 pm

pennview wrote:Given the possibility of damage to the index wheel during use, perhaps a method of locking the spindle when fluting, reeding, or drilling would alleviate any stress on the wheel. One solution would be to mound the sanding disk (or another disc mounted on a faceplate) on the rear spindle and build a block of sorts attached to tube ways so that one could use a quick clamp to clamp the sanding disk to the block and thereby immobilize the spindle.

I've seen a number of lathes with built-in indexing wheels that were damaged because the user failed to lock the spindle. It's best to unplug the machine as well so one doesn't accidentally turn it on with the index pin in place.


This is certainly an idea]http://www.shopsmith.net/forums/attachment.htm?attachmentid=2301&d=1225671946[/url]

However, reible's really takes all the play out of the picture. Normally the Mark V has a bit of angular play between the quill-output-shaft and the upper-accessory shaft. Great job, Ed!

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Chris

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#70339 by iclark » Fri Jul 02, 2010 11:49 pm

reible wrote:This type of chuck uses an adapter to go from the shopsmith shaft size to the chuck size, this portion is threaded and this is the interface where the indexing wheel is captured.

some things are just so obvious when explained, but can be bewildering until then.

in other words:
doh! <sound of forehead slapping>:)

thank you.

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Mark V (84) w/ jigsaw, belt sander, strip sander
ER10 awaiting restoration

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#72824 by gregf » Thu Aug 12, 2010 5:34 pm

For anyone that wants a metal indexing wheel.
I just got one from Alisam engineering with a 1" center hole for $50.
www.alisam.com
Well made, in the USA.

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Richwood, OH
There is no such thing as an unsafe tool, only unsafe owners. If you make a machine idiot-proof, God will invent a better idiot.

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