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Restoration Progress On My 1986 Gray

#56461 by heathicus » Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:22 am

I finally started taking apart my 1986 Gray Mark V I acquired back in the summer. Like Mike has done, I'll use this thread to document my progress and ask questions. It won't be anything near the detail that Mike has achieved with his threads, though.

Temperatures got up to the high 40's/low 50's today so I was able to get a little work done. So far I have completely disassembled the base and legs (except casters), the base arm hinge, carriage assembly, etc. I have the headstock almost completely disassembled. All that remains is the drive sleeve assembly and idler shaft. After bouncing some ideas off of MickyD, I've even decided on a paint scheme. I think it will be unique and personally relevant, but not crazy. But I've got a long way to go before I can start painting. Everything looks to be in good shape so far. This should be a pretty simple rebuild. Take it apart, clean it and lube as necessary, repaint, and reassemble.

And now I ask my first question. Since I'm going to repaint, I have to remove everything from the parts to be painted. And I can't for the life of me figure out how to get the power cable out of the motor pan. The grommet looks like it's two pieces and that there should be a way to disengage whatever catch there is holding it together, but I can't figure it out. I worked on it long enough tonight that I was getting mad and getting ready to just cut the thing out and decided that was time to quit for a while and ask for help!

Oh, and I also wanted to say thanks to MickyD, Bill Mayo, and JPG40504. MickyD's restoration guides have been inspiring and I actually think I might tackle polishing some of the aluminum pieces like he did. JPG's reassembly guide has already saved me a couple of times. By reading his guide on how to put the machine back together has helped me figure out how to take it apart! And Bill Mayo is just a wealth of information. He sent me a headstock disassembly/maintenance/reassembly checklist that he put together. It has certainly helped a lot. And of course there have been many many other people who have shared information here and I thank you all!

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Heath
Central Louisiana
-10ER - SN 13927, Born 1949, Acquired October 2008, Restored November, 2008
-10ER - SN 35630, Born 1950, Acquired April 2009, Restored May 2009, A34 Jigsaw
-Mark V - SN 212052, Born 1986, Acquired Sept 2009, Restored March 2010, Bandsaw
-10ER - SN 39722, Born 1950, Acquired March 2011, awaiting restoration

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#56464 by billmayo » Mon Jan 11, 2010 4:00 am

heathicus wrote:And now I ask my first question. Since I'm going to repaint, I have to remove everything from the parts to be painted. And I can't for the life of me figure out how to get the power cable out of the motor pan. The grommet looks like it's two pieces and that there should be a way to disengage whatever catch there is holding it together, but I can't figure it out. I worked on it long enough tonight that I was getting mad and getting ready to just cut the thing out and decided that was time to quit for a while and ask for help!



You should see the grommet is one large part with a smaller part inserted into the larger part (2 pieces). I use a large regular or slip joint pliers to sqeeze the small part further into the larger part and then, pull both parts and the power cord from the motor pan.

Older Shopsmiths had a rubber grommet with 6 ears that holds the power cord. I use a small flat blade screwdriver to compress each ear so it starts through the motor pan hole while pulling on the cord. I work my way around the grommet doing each ear untill all ears are started into the motor pan hole. Then the power cord should be eased out the motor pan hole.

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Bill Mayo [url]bill.mayo@verizon.net[/url]
Shopsmith owner since 73. Sell, repair and rebuild Shopsmith, Total Shop & Wood Master headstocks, SPTs, attachments, accessories and parts. US Navy 1955-1975 (FTCS/E-8)

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#56478 by heathicus » Mon Jan 11, 2010 10:16 am

billmayo wrote:You should see the grommet is one large part with a smaller part inserted into the larger part (2 pieces). I use a large regular or slip joint pliers to sqeeze the small part further into the larger part and then, pull both parts and the power cord from the motor pan.

Older Shopsmiths had a rubber grommet with 6 ears that holds the power cord. I use a small flat blade screwdriver to compress each ear so it starts through the motor pan hole while pulling on the cord. I work my way around the grommet doing each ear until all ears are started into the motor pan hole. Then the power cord should be eased out the motor pan hole.


Thanks, Bill! I must have reached my functional limit last night when I was working on it. In the shower this morning (where I do my best thinking) with a clear mind that solution hit me. I smacked myself in the head and asked me, "Why didn't I just squeeze it with some channel locks?" Last night I just had my brain locked on separating the two pieces of the grommet first for some reason. :o

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Heath
Central Louisiana
-10ER - SN 13927, Born 1949, Acquired October 2008, Restored November, 2008
-10ER - SN 35630, Born 1950, Acquired April 2009, Restored May 2009, A34 Jigsaw
-Mark V - SN 212052, Born 1986, Acquired Sept 2009, Restored March 2010, Bandsaw
-10ER - SN 39722, Born 1950, Acquired March 2011, awaiting restoration

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Tool for everything

#56485 by albie » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:01 pm

You know that there must be a tool for everything, right? Even these simple plastic grommets. With offset jaws so as not to inter fear with the cable
I found this in an electronics surplus store ....
[ATTACH]7320[/ATTACH]

Attachments

P1110049.JPG
P1110049.JPG (62.03 KiB) Viewed 6122 times

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Al B
Shopsmith Greenie (my late Dad's); My 520, 6" Belt Sander, Bandsaw, Jointer, pro planer, scroll saw, Jig saw, strip sander, router table, OPR, dust collector, power station, & power stands

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#56491 by JPG » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:55 pm

albie wrote:You know that there must be a tool for everything, right? Even these simple plastic grommets. With offset jaws so as not to inter fear with the cable
I found this in an electronics surplus store ....
[ATTACH]7320[/ATTACH]


Those Heyco plastic strain reliefs are no Simple Grommet!

They are shaped with opposing flats and are mounted in a double d hole(prevents rotation).

They incorporate an offset pocket and 'pusher' to secure the cord(keeps it from moving in /out).

They have a groove below the outer flange which prevents it slipping out of the hole(to over come this that tool(or channel lock) is needed).

The effectiveness of the retention groove is what makes it so difficult to remove. Realize that when squeezing the 'small' part, you are compressing the power cord!

Be thankful of the current 'improved' design which connects the two pieces so as to not lose one of them while 'removed'.:eek:

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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#56570 by heathicus » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:48 pm

Channel locks did the job. I still had to wiggle and push and pull a good bit, but it really wasn't any problem.

I only have a few spots where rust is a problem. The three inches or so of the quill that had been left exposed for years (as well as the saw arbor that was on it), the exposed ends of the quill feed pinion, the inside of the motor pan (it looks like it held a little water at one time, but everything else inside the headstock looks good), and the caster assemblies which are the worst of all.

It also looks like something hard might have bounced around in the motor pan at one point. Several of the ridges on the back (outside?) side of the floating sheave have nicks in them, but nothing requiring replacement. Also the philips head on one of the motor pan to motor screws was rounded out showing that at least an attempt had once been made to remove the motor pan - presumably to remove whatever had gotten in there and nicked the floating sheave.

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Heath
Central Louisiana
-10ER - SN 13927, Born 1949, Acquired October 2008, Restored November, 2008
-10ER - SN 35630, Born 1950, Acquired April 2009, Restored May 2009, A34 Jigsaw
-Mark V - SN 212052, Born 1986, Acquired Sept 2009, Restored March 2010, Bandsaw
-10ER - SN 39722, Born 1950, Acquired March 2011, awaiting restoration

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#58805 by heathicus » Mon Feb 01, 2010 10:47 pm

Taking inspiration from MickyD, I did a trial run of some aluminum polishing on Sunday. The day was drawing to a close and my hands were getting cold and I just wanted something to show for all my preparation. So I grabbed the headrest lock handle and did a quick and dirty polishing job. I didn't go through all the grits that Mike did. I just used a 220 grit pad on my random orbit sander until it was uniformly smooth, then went straight to the spiral sewn buffer wheel with black compound. After several minutes, this was the result.

Image

Image

I wish I had taken a before picture for comparison, but as you can imagine, it was pretty dingy and dull. I've been very encouraged with this result. I'm anxious to be able to get back out there and do it right - sand up to 600 grit and go through all 3 buffing steps and bring these parts to a true mirror finish.

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Heath
Central Louisiana
-10ER - SN 13927, Born 1949, Acquired October 2008, Restored November, 2008
-10ER - SN 35630, Born 1950, Acquired April 2009, Restored May 2009, A34 Jigsaw
-Mark V - SN 212052, Born 1986, Acquired Sept 2009, Restored March 2010, Bandsaw
-10ER - SN 39722, Born 1950, Acquired March 2011, awaiting restoration

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#58817 by mickyd » Tue Feb 02, 2010 6:41 am

Twill be a beauty of a machine!!! Sure does make a difference as compared to the old stock finish. You'll see that starting at 60 or 100 and working your way up through 600 will make it look like chrome. Takes a lot of time and effort but to me, it was worth it. Really sets the machine apart. Nice job Heath.

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Mike
Sunny San Diego
Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 309828, Born Oct '55, Acquired Feb '09, Born Again May '09
Mark 5 Jigsaw SN 65001, Born Aug '55
Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 287942, Born Dec '54, Acquired Oct '09. Came with Magna Eng. Jointer SN 17792, Born Jun '54, awaiting restoration
ER10 - SN 72883, Born ~Sep '52, Acquired Apr '09, Restoration started Jun '09, Born Again Jan '10
ER jigsaw, awaiting restoration
Pro Planer SN??, Born ?, Acquired Mar '10

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#58828 by georgek1 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 10:40 am

Heath

What did you use to sand prior to using the polishing wheel? What did you mount the sandpaper on to get so close to those small areas? Looks great and I am in the process of restoring an old ER that I have recently acquired.

George

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George
Ormond Beach FL SS 520, Jointer, Band Saw, Miter Saw, Radial Arm Saw, OPR, Router Table, 5 Routers, Incra 5000, Table top Drill Press, Thickness Planer

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#58831 by heathicus » Tue Feb 02, 2010 11:03 am

georgek1 wrote:Heath

What did you use to sand prior to using the polishing wheel? What did you mount the sandpaper on to get so close to those small areas? Looks great and I am in the process of restoring an old ER that I have recently acquired.

George


I just used a 220 grit pad on a 5" random orbit sander. For the majority of the work, I clamped the handle to my work surface. For some of it, I needed to hold the handle in one hand and the sander in the other. The small areas actually aren't too bad on this handle. The sanding pad had a very slight overhang (maybe 1/16") around the edge of the sander. I was able to get that overhang to conform to some of the tighter curves.

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Heath
Central Louisiana
-10ER - SN 13927, Born 1949, Acquired October 2008, Restored November, 2008
-10ER - SN 35630, Born 1950, Acquired April 2009, Restored May 2009, A34 Jigsaw
-Mark V - SN 212052, Born 1986, Acquired Sept 2009, Restored March 2010, Bandsaw
-10ER - SN 39722, Born 1950, Acquired March 2011, awaiting restoration

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