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What color to paint my ER10? (post #216)

Poll ended at Sat Nov 21, 2009 12:35 pm

Original OEM gray
18
50%
Rustoleum burgundy
13
36%
Other (post you answer)
5
14%
 
Total votes : 36

#57426 by bucksaw » Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:58 am

mickyd wrote:Wanted……ER10 miter gage indicator….

I don’t feel I abused the heat from propane torch. I was evenly heating the piece and I felt the pliers that I was using start to close. I stopped immediately and looked at the piece and I could see where the pliers were digging in. Then I looked dead on at the face with the indicator button and saw where the top actually collapsed. I’m not sure if this piece is aluminum. Possibly white metal??

Anyway….disgusted!!


I think I would have drilled in from the back side and punched it out. Not sure if if would have worked. But in my head, it's a great idea. Looks like aluminum.

---

Dave - Idaho
Greenie S#261612 - Mar 1954 / Greenie S#305336 - Oct 1955 / Gray S#SS1360 - ?

"Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways?" :cool:

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#57433 by mickyd » Wed Jan 20, 2010 12:10 pm

bucksaw wrote:I think I would have drilled in from the back side and punched it out. Not sure if if would have worked. But in my head, it's a great idea. Looks like aluminum.

Based on part geometry, drilling from the backside would be tricky due to the angular surfaces of both the back end where you'd start the hole, and then drilling into the mounting holes 41°]only[/B] remembers failures.

Even though the attempt failed, I think it was a good logical starting point. Logical and failed in the same sentence???? :eek: I'm OK with that. As I look at the piece today with lower blood pressure and calmer thoughts, I think it's still fixable.

Plan of action is.....drill through the center of the button and remainder of part with a small pilot hole being real cautious when I get to the mounting hole countersunk surface. I'll put a center punch dimple on the countersunk surface for the drill to locate on and continue through the part. Then come in through the backside with a slightly larger bit stopping when I get to the beginning of the button hole . Then insert an appropriate sized dowel pin to butt up against the back of the button and then smash the beejeezes out of in with a 12 lb sledgehammer (or a small ball peen hammer, which ever is closer). If all successful, JB Weld to hide the evidence, slap on a coat of primer, hammered paint, badda-bing, badda bang, Houston, we have a functional miter gage indicator!!

Sound like a plan??

---

Mike
Sunny San Diego
Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 309828, Born Oct '55, Acquired Feb '09, Born Again May '09
Mark 5 Jigsaw SN 65001, Born Aug '55
Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 287942, Born Dec '54, Acquired Oct '09. Came with Magna Eng. Jointer SN 17792, Born Jun '54, awaiting restoration
ER10 - SN 72883, Born ~Sep '52, Acquired Apr '09, Restoration started Jun '09, Born Again Jan '10
ER jigsaw, awaiting restoration
Pro Planer SN??, Born ?, Acquired Mar '10

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#57440 by JPG » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:19 pm

mickyd wrote:And the ratio is............

Some of this, some of that. Oh and some lacquer thinner to boot! I just threw some together b4 an acquisition trip!

In fairness, the rust between the tube and the casting was not all that bad. The interesting part to me was how quickly it seeped through. Also how widespread it was when separation 'occurred'.

---

╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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#57441 by tkhudson » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:23 pm

mickyd wrote:Based on part geometry, drilling from the backside would be tricky due to the angular surfaces of both the back end where you'd start the hole, and then drilling into the mounting holes 41° countersunk surface. Not saying impossible but definitely not a 'stage it up......plunge the drill in' operation especially for a semi-greenhorn such as myself. It looked like a broken drill bit waiting to happen, not to mention missing the general center area of the button in turn possible damaging the spring. It's probably above my machining skills. Had I done that, I would have REALLY kicked myself since 'the little guy' in the head kept saying "don't EVEN go there!!". The 'little guys' is like SWMBO....don't listen and pay the consequences.:D Even if you succeed, the 'little guy' only remembers failures.

Even though the attempt failed, I think it was a good logical starting point. Logical and failed in the same sentence???? :eek: I'm OK with that. As I look at the piece today with lower blood pressure and calmer thoughts, I think it's still fixable.

Plan of action is.....drill through the center of the button and remainder of part with a small pilot hole being real cautious when I get to the mounting hole countersunk surface. I'll put a center punch dimple on the countersunk surface for the drill to locate on and continue through the part. Then come in through the backside with a slightly larger bit stopping when I get to the beginning of the button hole . Then insert an appropriate sized dowel pin to butt up against the back of the button and then smash the beejeezes out of in with a 12 lb sledgehammer (or a small ball peen hammer, which ever is closer). If all successful, JB Weld to hide the evidence, slap on a coat of primer, hammered paint, badda-bing, badda bang, Houston, we have a functional miter gage indicator!!

Sound like a plan??


The thing is at this point you cant screw it up any worse by trying to fix it... GO FOR IT

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#57442 by JPG » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:27 pm

mickyd wrote:Based on part geometry, drilling from the backside would be tricky due to the angular surfaces of both the back end where you'd start the hole, and then drilling into the mounting holes 41° countersunk surface. Not saying impossible but definitely not a 'stage it up......plunge the drill in' operation especially for a semi-greenhorn such as myself. It looked like a broken drill bit waiting to happen, not to mention missing the general center area of the button in turn possible damaging the spring. It's probably above my machining skills. Had I done that, I would have REALLY kicked myself since 'the little guy' in the head kept saying "don't EVEN go there!!". The 'little guys' is like SWMBO....don't listen and pay the consequences.:D Even if you succeed, the 'little guy' only remembers failures.

Even though the attempt failed, I think it was a good logical starting point. Logical and failed in the same sentence???? :eek: I'm OK with that. As I look at the piece today with lower blood pressure and calmer thoughts, I think it's still fixable.

Plan of action is.....drill through the center of the button and remainder of part with a small pilot hole being real cautious when I get to the mounting hole countersunk surface. I'll put a center punch dimple on the countersunk surface for the drill to locate on and continue through the part. Then come in through the backside with a slightly larger bit stopping when I get to the beginning of the button hole . Then insert an appropriate sized dowel pin to butt up against the back of the button and then smash the beejeezes out of in with a 12 lb sledgehammer (or a small ball peen hammer, which ever is closer). If all successful, JB Weld to hide the evidence, slap on a coat of primer, hammered paint, badda-bing, badda bang, Houston, we have a functional miter gage indicator!!

Sound like a plan??

I think so!

BTW an end mill would create a flat surface for the drill bit prior to drilling. Yah I know you have heard that before. This one does not have to be very large. Don't ya have any buddies in the machine shop bidness that might loan you one?

---

╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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#57443 by shipwright » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:57 pm

Mike

I'm with Chris. Stop working [color="Red"]ON[/color] your machine and start working [color="Red"]WITH[/color] your machine. Sawdust is better than Prozac and it doesn't make you homicidal. (all that often)

Paul M

---

Paul M ........ The early bird gets the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese

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#57445 by dusty » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:59 pm

JPG40504 wrote:I think so!

BTW an end mill would create a flat surface for the drill bit prior to drilling. Yah I know you have heard that before. This one does not have to be very large. Don't ya have any buddies in the machine shop bidness that might loan you one?


I have some "buddies" that might do some work for me (free gratis) but I don't have any who will loan me tools.

That is a cardinal rule for me. I do not loan or borrow tools or weapons. I believe that one of the surest ways to loss a good friend is to loan him/her a tool (maybe money fits in there too).

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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#57446 by mickyd » Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:22 pm

nuhobby wrote:Mike,
Don't despair, dude! I just looked at the whole thread again, and you've done SO much.
I vote that you (eventually) make your own custom brass indicator. But start making sawdust now..... wood projects tend to have their own mistakes which require innovation along the way. It's good perspective on life, if you think about it.

Thanks for the compliments and words of encouragement. Your post about the brass replacement made me decide that if I can get this piece functional, I am going to polish it to a mirror finish like I did with my Greenie knobs / handles. :D Kinda like chrome plating a Pinto station wagon but sometimes, you just have an urge that needs to be satisfied, and this in now one of them!!

---

Mike

Sunny San Diego

Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 309828, Born Oct '55, Acquired Feb '09, Born Again May '09

Mark 5 Jigsaw SN 65001, Born Aug '55

Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 287942, Born Dec '54, Acquired Oct '09. Came with Magna Eng. Jointer SN 17792, Born Jun '54, awaiting restoration

ER10 - SN 72883, Born ~Sep '52, Acquired Apr '09, Restoration started Jun '09, Born Again Jan '10

ER jigsaw, awaiting restoration

Pro Planer SN??, Born ?, Acquired Mar '10

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#57449 by dusty » Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:39 pm

mickyd wrote:Thanks for the compliments and words of encouragement. Your post about the brass replacement made me decide that if I can get this piece functional, I am going to polish it to a mirror finish like I did with my Greenie knobs / handles. :D Kinda like chrome plating a Pinto station wagon but sometimes, you just have an urge that needs to be satisfied, and this in now one of them!!

If he stays busy polishing it, he won't have to get either one of them all dirty making sawdust.:rolleyes:

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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#57452 by mickyd » Wed Jan 20, 2010 3:23 pm

shipwright wrote:Mike

I'm with Chris. Stop working ON your machine and start working WITH your machine. Sawdust is better than Prozac and it doesn't make you homicidal. (all that often)

Paul M

Sorry Paul (and Chris)....I can't. :( It's just not in my nature. Working in QA my entire career, dealing every day with cosmetic quality decisions, not to mention 6 years in the world of high tech, automated big ticket color and appearance measuring instrument manufacture (i.e. colorimeters, spectrophotometers, haze, gloss, and translucency measuring devices), I've been somehow transformed into one that has cosmetic satisfaction 'issues'. :D I would genetically pass it along to my off spring I am sure.

When the sawdust starts to fly, which WILL BE SOON, it will fly with beauty and gusto. Hopefully, this summers Chris Craft restoration will not take me 100% away from other smaller type woodworking projects.

---

Mike

Sunny San Diego

Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 309828, Born Oct '55, Acquired Feb '09, Born Again May '09

Mark 5 Jigsaw SN 65001, Born Aug '55

Mark 5 "Greenie" SN 287942, Born Dec '54, Acquired Oct '09. Came with Magna Eng. Jointer SN 17792, Born Jun '54, awaiting restoration

ER10 - SN 72883, Born ~Sep '52, Acquired Apr '09, Restoration started Jun '09, Born Again Jan '10

ER jigsaw, awaiting restoration

Pro Planer SN??, Born ?, Acquired Mar '10

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