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17 posts 1 2

jointer problem!

#18990 by drnewton » Mon Jun 30, 2008 10:50 pm

Hello,

I bought a used shopsmith jointer. The knivers were badly damaged so I ordered some new ones and went to replace the old.... One of the set screws holding the wedge in is completely stripped!!

What can I do to remove this screw?!?

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#18994 by Bruce » Mon Jun 30, 2008 11:35 pm

I assume you mean that the hex head is stripped out so the hex wrench won't hold to remove it? If so, I would try an easy-out screw extractor to remove the damaged screw if you can't get a vise-grip pliers to grip the head. If I remember right the screw head is recessed in the wedge, which would make it tough to use the pliers method.

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#19078 by drnewton » Wed Jul 02, 2008 8:05 pm

well, I tried using a screw extractor and I do believe I made it worse. What can I do short of replacing the entire jointer!?

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jointer problem!

#19080 by dusty » Wed Jul 02, 2008 8:24 pm

I would suggest that you talk to Customer Service (1-800-543-7586).

I would also suggest that you remove those blades that you can if you haven't already done so. Those puppies are dangerous if you are not paying attention to them.

Consider the possibility that you will need to purchase a new cutter head assembly (517363). It costs something on the order of $150.00 unless you can find it on sale.

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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#19101 by charlese » Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:27 pm

drnewton wrote:well, I tried using a screw extractor and I do believe I made it worse. What can I do short of replacing the entire jointer!?


You can order a new "Cutter Head Assembly" part # 517363. After a few tears, (monetary ones) I did! One of the bearings on the cutter head shaft got jammed and I did not notice, until the shaft got worn down. The price seems high, but it comes with new blades, screws and wedges. The old part now sits on my bench in case I can figure out a way to fix it.

Anyway, now the tears are dry (along with the spilled milk) and my jointer is now running again at precision levels.

Good luck! :)

P.S. The Cutter Head Assembly also comes with new bearings and bearing housings. Really, this assembly is a good buy, when you consider the housings alone are about $50.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#19118 by chiroindixon » Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:33 pm

One upgrade I would love for my Shopsmith jointer, is a spiral cutter head.

Doc

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#19125 by charlese » Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:05 pm

Hi Doc! I've been kinda fascinated by the spiral cutters in jointers and planers since first viewing the adds for them. There are a couple of things about them that have me baffled.

1) How does one sharpen those little blades
2) How much finagling is needed to adjust them when replacing.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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spiral cutterheads

#19130 by greitz » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:01 am

Chuck- I have no personal experience, but I do have a copy of the Grizzly catalog right here. They have two types of spiral cutterheads, one with three spiral blades, and the other with four spirals consisting of "indexable, four-sided carbide inserts". For the carbide insert type, it says "... can be rotated to provide four factory sharp edges before replacement."

So it doesn't sound like they're meant to be resharpened. And I just can't seem to find Grizzly's jointer/planer knife resharpening jig anywhere in the catalog. Hmmm. And I haven't looked, but I'd bet that there's no video showing the procedure on their website, either. Hmmm. (Sorry for the sarcasm, it's been a long day.)

I guess I'm just spoiled. No spirals for me. I really like knowing that when I mess up my blades, I can resharpen them myself. And knowing that there's a video available to show me the installation procedure, that's warm fuzzies right there. Thanks, Nick and Drew!!!

Gary

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#19131 by charlese » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:30 am

greitz wrote:Chuck- I have no personal experience, but I do have a copy of the Grizzly catalog right here. They have two types of spiral cutterheads, one with three spiral blades, and the other with four spirals consisting of "indexable, four-sided carbide inserts". For the carbide insert type, it says "... can be rotated to provide four factory sharp edges before replacement."

So it doesn't sound like they're meant to be resharpened. And I just can't seem to find Grizzly's jointer/planer knife resharpening jig anywhere in the catalog. Hmmm. And I haven't looked, but I'd bet that there's no video showing the procedure on their website, either. Hmmm. (Sorry for the sarcasm, it's been a long day.)

I guess I'm just spoiled. No spirals for me. I really like knowing that when I mess up my blades, I can resharpen them myself. And knowing that there's a video available to show me the installation procedure, that's warm fuzzies right there. Thanks, Nick and Drew!!!

Gary

That's what I have read also! I guess when one of the blades get chipped or dull, you are supposed to rotate it. I suppose the blades are seated fairly easily, but I would hate to get one in a little cockeyed. That way the jointer would turn into a molder.

Not for me either! I like sharp blades and jig that will let me remove nicks. (Small 'n') Honing and stropping of blades on the Shopsmith jointer is a piece of cake. They don't need to be ground to re-sharpen. Wonder if that same procedure would work on a spiral machine. With that many blades, it seems easy to hone unevenly across the cutter width.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.

Chuck in Lancaster, CA

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#19135 by Randy » Fri Jul 04, 2008 8:35 am

When you said you have tried easy outs, did you drill first?

Try using a left hand spiral, left hand cut drill (as seen here and the extractors here) Sometimes when using a left hand drill (you also have to use your drill on reverse) it will bit into the screw and take it out for you. Make sure you let the screw sit in some type of penetrating liquid to help loosen it up first.

You can also try some heat/rapid cooling, but this may ruin the blade as it may remove the temper. It may also weaken the cutter head. (if you are using penetrating liquid make sure it is all evaporated as open flame will ignite it)

You can also use a dremel with a rotary file to cut a groove in the head an try a flat head screwdriver.

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