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what's the spindle knob for?

#82383 by algale » Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:51 am

Another newbie question: What is the spindle knob for? The spindle knob (seems to be part no. 65 on the headstock part list) is that silver or chrome colored, knurled knob with the allen set screw that is on the main spindle. first I thought it acted as a stop, preventing the spindle from retracting, but that clearly isn't right; that's the job of part no. 64, the retaining ring.

So, anybody got a guess what the spindle knob is used for if anything? Is it just a handle for turning the spindle by hand?

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#82391 by holsgo » Mon Jan 17, 2011 10:12 am

It doesn't really do anything except provide a hand hold to manually turn the spindle. If you remove it you will see the retaining ring in the quill which holds in the bearing. It's also a stop for the chucks you put on the spindle.

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#82395 by JPG » Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:18 am

holsgo wrote:It doesn't really do anything except provide a hand hold to manually turn the spindle. If you remove it you will see the retaining ring in the quill which holds in the bearing. It's also a stop for the chucks you put on the spindle.


Mine sets the shaft to bearing clearance. The shaft behind the bearing has a shoulder that presses against the inner race of the bearing. The knurled collar controls the amount of clearance(slop?) between the front of the bearing and the collar. The collar prevents the quill shaft from being pushed back into the headstock.

The older single bearing quills do not have the internal retaining ring.

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╟JPG ╢
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Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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#82402 by holsgo » Mon Jan 17, 2011 12:28 pm

I stand corrected. Like you seem to know already about my comment, I have a 54 greenie. I could run the machine without this collar (and I have when I put the 3 new bearings in) to no ill effects. You and a couple others seem to be the poly v experts.

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#82416 by dusty » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:06 pm

JPG40504 wrote:Mine sets the shaft to bearing clearance. The shaft behind the bearing has a shoulder that presses against the inner race of the bearing. The knurled collar controls the amount of clearance(slop?) between the front of the bearing and the collar. The collar prevents the quill shaft from being pushed back into the headstock.

The older single bearing quills do not have the internal retaining ring.

On which models? I have a 510/520 and a 510 and I don't understand how this collar does what you have said.

Is this the knurled collar that is being discussed?

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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#82421 by holsgo » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:02 pm

That's the collar. Mine does exactly what you see in the pic. However this collar doesn't stop the quill from retracting, hold the bearings, none of that.

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#82425 by dusty » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:34 pm

holsgo wrote:That's the collar. Mine does exactly what you see in the pic. However this collar doesn't stop the quill from retracting, hold the bearings, none of that.


There is a spring clip right behind that collar that can not be seen in these photos. Maybe that is what prevents the quill from slipping into the headstock.

Maybe that and the fact that the quill is too long to go very far into the headstock.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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#82432 by holsgo » Mon Jan 17, 2011 7:22 pm

Yes, the spring clip clips into the groove in the quill. This clip holds the bearings from coming forward if you were to remove the quill and put pressure on the splined end. What prevents the whole quill from going into the headstock all the way is that raised area behind this collar.. in your pics. As I was playing with my bearing mod I had this collar off and put it on only to hand turn the spindle. Just being clear for the thread originator..you know all of this Dusty.

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#82442 by JPG » Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:09 am

holsgo wrote:Yes, the spring clip clips into the groove in the quill. This clip holds the bearings from coming forward if you were to remove the quill and put pressure on the splined end. What prevents the whole quill from going into the headstock all the way is that raised area behind this collar.. in your pics. As I was playing with my bearing mod I had this collar off and put it on only to hand turn the spindle. Just being clear for the thread originator..you know all of this Dusty.


I find your retaining clip on a 'greenie' interesting. My 'goldie' does not have a retaining ring, but a 2 bearing quill I have does have the retaining clip.

Understand that for the quill shaft to slip into the headstock. it must slip in the inner race. Considerable force is required to do so. The collar provides additional resistance to that shaft in/out movement. My old goldie is loose enough in the bearing(newly replaced) that it slips in fairly easily. The collar prevents that. If it is not attached tight, the quill shaft will slide in and out.

FWIW the outer race is easily sliped also. The collar prevents that also!

I presume if your bearings are wedged in tight enough, the collar does nothing to retain them. That is not the case with my original goldie quill.

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╔═══╗
╟JPG ╢
╚═══╝

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

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#82445 by dusty » Tue Jan 18, 2011 5:34 am

holsgo wrote:Yes, the spring clip clips into the groove in the quill. This clip holds the bearings from coming forward if you were to remove the quill and put pressure on the splined end. What prevents the whole quill from going into the headstock all the way is that raised area behind this collar.. in your pics. As I was playing with my bearing mod I had this collar off and put it on only to hand turn the spindle. Just being clear for the thread originator..you know all of this Dusty.
I hope that your question was answered, algale. It seems obvious to me that we do not have a definitive, universal answer to your question regarding the function of the knurled collar.

Yes, if the spring clip is not there but the knurled collar is attached to the 'quill shaft' in its normal fashion, the rearward travel of the quill shaft would be impeded. But I do not believe that is the function of the knurled collar.

The collar would not have to be knurled to do that. Being knurled may be the real clue. Maybe it is a knob for turning the quill shaft. It is also something of a seal to protect the bearing from the saw dust. Notice how it is milled to fit back into the quill housing.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty
Sent from my Dell XPS using Firefox.

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