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Set Screws

Post #111579 by dusty » Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:30 am

In an off topic discussion in another thread there was discussion about the arbor set screw and concern about it coming loose. This discussion sent me looking for this thread.

It is important, when replacing set screws, to replace them with the right type and size. Knowing what is right is hard to achieve. I hope the listing posted in the referenced thread helps to that end.

I also hope that is there are errors those are pointed out.

This is another version of the list of set screws I compiled earlier and referenced here.

[ATTACH]16482[/ATTACH]

Note: The number in the second column is the reference number used in the online catalog illustrated parts lists.

The colored back ground indicates that this part is also used elsewhere.

This list is a compilation of data gathered from a small sample set of equipments and does not represent the final word. If you see what seems to be an error, PLEASE report that here in this thread.

Don't labor under the assumption that if you have the "Help Kit" your set screw requirements are satisfied. There are a number of set screws used by Shopsmith that are NOT in the Help Kit.

[size=84]Added Information: 4/30/2012

I have added a small amount of additional data to the chart referenced above. A have also changed the format (sorted on part number) hopefully to make the data more useful. If I could only post this in excel format so that you guys/gals could sort at will but the forum doesn't provide that capability.

[/SIZE][ATTACH]17330[/ATTACH]

The information contained in the last column (far right) provides access to a Fastenal site that provides more detail about the parts. This link also provides a digital image of the part in question. Simple google that URL and you'll be there.

I don't know why some of the URLs are in blue while others are not.
[size=84] [/SIZE]

Attachments

[The extension doc has been deactivated and can no longer be displayed.]

[The extension doc has been deactivated and can no longer be displayed.]

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

Post #111584 by flashbacpt » Sun Feb 26, 2012 9:42 am

Thanks Dusty! This is one of those things that one wishes that they had when the time comes!

John
FlashbacPT

Post #111593 by oddie » Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:38 am

Thank you for this list. I just didn't realize there was a difference in setscrews. They all look alike to me.

To help with my education, could someone explain why the difference in the ends and under what circumstances you would use one kind and not another. Why a flat? Domed? Pointed? etc?

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Have a safe day!

Oddie

510(upgraded 500), 500, 10ER, power station, belt sander, bandsaw, jointer, SS compressor, jigsaw, dust collector

Post #111594 by dlbristol » Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:44 am

Thanks Dusty, That is saved in the SS binder.

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Saw dust heals many wounds. RLTW
Dave

Post #111595 by dusty » Sun Feb 26, 2012 10:53 am

oddie wrote:Thank you for this list. I just didn't realize there was a difference in setscrews. They all look alike to me.

To help with my education, could someone explain why the difference in the ends and under what circumstances you would use one kind and not another. Why a flat? Domed? Pointed? a Dogged, a Half Dogged, a Serrated etc?

Some of the various answers are obvious but I do hope someone cames up with a good explanation for why one and not another in a given application.

The one that goes in the top of the quill is a half dog and a visual examination of the landing area (in the groove on top of the quill) provides the answer. That along with the fact that you really do not want hard contact between the quill and the set screw.

Others are not so obvious. Why a pointed and not a serrated? or vice versa? Why a domed and not not a flat?

This is part of my complaint with the incomplete Shopsmith description. Example: A 5/16"-18x1/2" can be satisfied by several wrong setscrews for a specific application.

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

Post #111597 by JPG » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:01 am

oddie wrote:Thank you for this list. I just didn't realize there was a difference in setscrews. They all look alike to me.

To help with my education, could someone explain why the difference in the ends and under what circumstances you would use one kind and not another. Why a flat? Domed? Pointed? etc?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_screw

Flat or dome point(quill shaft) Used where scarring of the shaft is undesirable.

Cup point Digs into shaft to grip more tightly (way tubes etc)

Serrated cup Acts similar to a lock washer

Point cup Old water pump idler shaft bearing eccentric

Half dog Quill anti rotation(top of headstock)

Cup or Serrated cup should only be used where disassembly is seldom or never and shaft scarring can be tolerated.

Add to the points variations is the self locking type(nyloc etc.) and driver type(slotted/allen/...)

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JPG

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4" jointer/6" beltsander/12" planer/stripsander/bandsaw/powerstation /Scroll saw/Jig saw /Craftsman 10" ras/Craftsman 6" thicknessplaner/ Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ Mark VII restoration in 'progress'/ 10
E(SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange

Post #111599 by rpd » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:07 am

Here is a link I found that shows drawings (we like pictures:) ) of the different set screw point styles and a short description of why they are used.

http://www.rctek.com/technical/fixings/grub_screws.html

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Ron Dyck
==================================================================
10ER #23430, 10ER #84609, two SS A-34 jigsaws for 10ER.
1959 Mark 5 #356595 Greenie, SS Magna Jointer, SS planer, SS bandsaw, DC3300,

Post #111629 by robinson46176 » Sun Feb 26, 2012 3:38 pm

One that I am fond of is a brass tipped set screw. Generally non marking on steel and reasonably self locking. I'm out right now but need to pick up some more. IIRC my Ace Hardware carries them but not very cheaply. Still it is cheaper than a drive to Indy. Then again there are an awfully lot of places to eat in Indy. ;)

[ATTACH]16456[/ATTACH]


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Attachments

temp brass tipped ser screw.jpeg
temp brass tipped ser screw.jpeg (3.91 KiB) Viewed 302 times

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--
farmer
Francis Robinson
I did not equip with Shopsmiths in spite of the setups but because of them.
1 1988 - Mark V 510 (bought new), 4 Poly vee 1 1/8th HP Mark V's, Mark VII, 1 Mark V Mini, 1 Frankensmith, 1 10-ER, 1 Mark V Push-me-Pull-me Drillpress, SS bandsaw, belt sander, jointer, jigsaw, shaper attach, mortising attach, TS-3650 Rigid tablesaw, RAS, 6" long bed jointer, Foley/Belsaw Planer/molder/ripsaw, 1" sander, oscillating spindle/belt sander, Scroll saw, Woodmizer sawmill

Post #111640 by dusty » Sun Feb 26, 2012 6:39 pm

robinson46176 wrote:One that I am fond of is a brass tipped set screw. Generally non marking on steel and reasonably self locking. I'm out right now but need to pick up some more. IIRC my Ace Hardware carries them but not very cheaply. Still it is cheaper than a drive to Indy. Then again there are an awfully lot of places to eat in Indy. ]16456[/ATTACH]


.


Where do you use these? Maybe what I should ask is "Do you chose to use these in lieu of specified tips"?

http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/detail.ex?sku=0134831

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"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

Post #111646 by jcraigie » Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:31 pm

$3.53 for one set screw! Holy crap:eek: You guys must be made out of money:rolleyes:

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1984 Mark V 500 and an early 1954 greenie. jointer, belt sander, bandsaw, jigsaw, planner.

Jeff

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