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So, long story short, I got a rusty, beat up SS 510 for free... so needless to say, I've been restoring it to functionality. Had good success, by the way, with rusty way tubes using EvapoRust.
Ok, so here is my question which I really tried to find the answer to on the forums:

Since the 510 table does not have a scale that shows how wide a cut is, how do SS users make cuts quickly? Just mark the stock and adjust the fence and quill as necessary? Or using a T-square? Or has anyone attached some sort of scale on the table surface??

If there are existing threads, please direct me... I did not find one.

I can't wait to make a first cut with this thing.

Post #53181 by Ed in Tampa » Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:18 pm

For ripping
I simply measure from the the tooth of the blade closest to the fence to fence. That distance will be the width of the board I cut. Never relied on a rip scale completely I always double check with my steel rule. I have two one 18" and the other 36"

For cross cut I usually mark the wood sight the mark with the side of the blade which is toward the piece I want. I then take a very very very little nibble of the wood and make sure my cut line is on my pencil line.

Two things to remember
1. I always set up my blade to fence distance with a steel rule rather than a measuring tape. More accurate.

2. I insure the steel rule is calibrated and reads exactly as does my tape measure if I'm using one for the project. I have seem more problems caused by people using different measuring tools where each one reads a little different than the other.

---

Ed in Tampa
Stay out of trouble!

Post #53182 by dusty » Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:40 pm

If you are going to use a tape measure, use the same one for the entire project UNLESS you are ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that both read the same.

If you have a cross cut sled, incorporate a measuring tape into the fence on the cross cut sled.

Don't forget, I repeat - don't forget, the blade (the kerf). I all too often find that I have a board that is just a little bit off because I failed to take the kerf into consideration.

Necessary change of topic: You said you got this puppy for free and it was rusty. That means to me, lack of care which goes right along with LUBRICATION, WHAT LUBRICATION?

Before you put many more MINUTES on that puppy - make sure it has been vacuumed out (cleaned) and lubricated and check belt tensions.

Are your blades sharp and have the adjustments been completed?

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

Post #53187 by beeg » Fri Dec 04, 2009 4:33 pm

Ed in Tampa wrote:For cross cut I usually mark the wood sight the mark with the side of the blade which is toward the piece I want. I then take a very very very little nibble of the wood and make sure my cut line is on my pencil line.




[color="Blue"]Ed, have ya seen this sawdust tip?

http://www.shopsmithacademy.com/Tips_Archives/TP112_Crosscut_Alignment.htm
[/color]

---

SS 500(09/1980), DC3300, jointer, bandsaw, belt sander, Strip Sander, drum sanders,molder, dado, biscuit joiner, universal lathe tool rest, Oneway talon chuck, router bits & chucks and a De Walt 735 planer,a #5,#6, block planes. ALL in a 100 square foot shop.
.
.

Bob

Post #53188 by dusty » Fri Dec 04, 2009 5:08 pm



If you use that tip to align the gauge on the rip fence to the metal ruler on the table rail you end up with a most reliable measuring tool. Certainly accurate to 1/32", the scale on the metal rule on the 520.

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

Post #53197 by krisztian » Fri Dec 04, 2009 9:03 pm

thanks for the tips so far. I realize that if one wants a super accurate cut, it's best to double check with a steel ruler. That said, having a fairly accurate scale is much quicker. I just have not had a table saw without a scale on it, so I thought maybe one of you SS guys had figured out a way to put a scale on yourselves? I guess that may be problematic since the blade itself is not always going to be in the same spot relative to the table since it's not actually fixed to the table.

To answer Dusty, I have not done any extensive adjustments, and I just ordered the 5/8" saw arbor and I have no blades yet. I did clean out just about everything in the main housing and put grease where I saw fit. She's a bit loud, but I have never heard a SS running before so I it's hard to know if somethings wrong. Have not checked the belt tension yet. Off topic, but thought I'd answer your post.

Thanks again for the quick tips, and keep em' comming if anything else pops up.

Post #53209 by charlese » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:48 pm

krisztian wrote:thanks for the tips so far. I realize that if one wants a super accurate cut, it's best to double check with a steel ruler. That said, having a fairly accurate scale is much quicker. I just have not had a table saw without a scale on it, so I thought maybe one of you SS guys had figured out a way to put a scale on yourselves?


I've always found it is more accurate (and sometimes faster) to use measuring blocks, story sticks, and stop blocks rather than a table mounted or hand held measuring tape.

---

Octogenarian's have an earned right to be a curmudgeon.
Chuck in Lancaster, CA

Post #53212 by judaspre1982 » Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:02 pm

charlese wrote:I've always found it is more accurate (and sometimes faster) to use measuring blocks, story sticks, and stop blocks rather than a table mounted or hand held measuring tape.

That is a great method Chuck. I will be using this method more often. Thanks for posting.----Dave

Post #53218 by Ed in Tampa » Sat Dec 05, 2009 1:01 am

krisztian wrote:thanks for the tips so far. I realize that if one wants a super accurate cut, it's best to double check with a steel ruler. That said, having a fairly accurate scale is much quicker. I just have not had a table saw without a scale on it, so I thought maybe one of you SS guys had figured out a way to put a scale on yourselves? I guess that may be problematic since the blade itself is not always going to be in the same spot relative to the table since it's not actually fixed to the table.

To answer Dusty, I have not done any extensive adjustments, and I just ordered the 5/8" saw arbor and I have no blades yet. I did clean out just about everything in the main housing and put grease where I saw fit. She's a bit loud, but I have never heard a SS running before so I it's hard to know if somethings wrong. Have not checked the belt tension yet. Off topic, but thought I'd answer your post.

Thanks again for the quick tips, and keep em' comming if anything else pops up.


The 520 upgrade has a scale to set the fence. However I rarely use it just as I rarely use a scale on any saw. To me it is much faster to mark my wood, eye ball the alignment and double check with a very very very small cut to verify I'm on.

I often make sure that the factory edge is against the fence and many times my waste cut actually is my keeper so I have to compersate for kerf thickness.

Perhaps it is just me but nearly every time I make a mistake in my cutting, board to long or too short it occurs when I used the rip scale on the saw.

Old dogs don't learn new tricks real easy so I guess I will continue to measure with a my trusty steel scale.


Yes I had seen Nick's way of setting up wood but I can do it much faster by sighting down my cut line against the edge of the blade.

---

Ed in Tampa
Stay out of trouble!

Post #53223 by dusty » Sat Dec 05, 2009 5:33 am

Ed in Tampa wrote:The 520 upgrade has a scale to set the fence. However I rarely use it just as I rarely use a scale on any saw. To me it is much faster to mark my wood, eye ball the alignment and double check with a very very very small cut to verify I'm on.

I often make sure that the factory edge is against the fence and many times my waste cut actually is my keeper so I have to compersate for kerf thickness.

Perhaps it is just me but nearly every time I make a mistake in my cutting, board to long or too short it occurs when I used the rip scale on the saw.

Old dogs don't learn new tricks real easy so I guess I will continue to measure with a my trusty steel scale.


Yes I had seen Nick's way of setting up wood but I can do it much faster by sighting down my cut line against the edge of the blade.


Ed, you have to calibrate that magnetic rule and even then you have to remember the kerf effect. Your steel scale, is it marked off in 1/16" or 1/32" or maybe even 1/64"?

Old dogs do learn new tricks. I now use the magnetic rule ("rip scale") all the time. I can always find it but I have to hunt for the tape measure. My steel rule hangs on the wall but it is a cheapy, it's only marked in 1/16" increments (first one foot is 1/32"). What good is that anyway. Do you only have to be precise for the first foot - after that "close enough" is good.

Charlese, with all your story boards and calibrated blocks of wood, how do you every find them. Do you have a cabinet for all the "measuring devices?

---

"Making Sawdust Safely"
Dusty

"If one's words are not better than silence, one should keep silent." -Caine

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