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Incra I-Box Versus Conventional Box Joint Jigs

Incra I-Box

Using the I-Box™ To Create a Box Joint --- Versus Doing So With a Conventional, Shop-Made Jig

Now, you can make precise, tight-fitting box joints  --  without the time-consuming trial-and-error dado blade shimming that's been driving you nuts  for years!

If you've ever created a box (or finger-lap) joint using a shop-made jig, you already know how time-consuming this process can be... how much lumber you can consume in the process... and how frustrated you can become in the attempt. And, Heaven help you if your spouse should attempt to interrupt you during this process... your wedded bliss could be in serious jeopardy !

It is a process that often requires a seemingly endless string of repetitive steps that can make even the strongest, most well-seasoned woodworkers want to pull their hair out by the roots. However, never fear because there is hope... as evidenced by the comparison below.

The I-Box will work with your Mark V or Mark 7 Table Saw... or with the under-table routing function of your Mark 7

The I-Box™ Method -- Step-by-Step

Step 1: Assemble the I-Box jig. This is a one-time step that is only required when you first receive your I-Box... and will not have to be repeated. It should require about 15 to 20 minutes, maximum.

Step 2: Set your stack dado blade set to the width of cut you desire. For example, if you want 3/8" joints, use two 1/8" blades and one 1/8" chipper. No Shims Will Be Required.

Step 3: Calibrate the I-Box to the cutter. Turn the red knob to bring the jig's two metal pin plates together, then make a kiss calibration adjustment until the edge of your blade just touches the edge of the pin plates. Make a test cut to verify the width of your dado cut.

Step 4: Adjust the distance between the pin plates to match your test cut. Turn the red knob to make this adjustment. As you do this, the left-right position of the two pin plates will be altered automatically to match the distance between the cuts to the width of your test cut... so all subsequent cuts will match-up perfectly.

Step 5: Make the appropriate number of cuts to complete your joints. It's just that simple.

Estimated amount of time required to complete the jig set-up process (Steps 2 through 5)... 10 minutes.

To make a different size finger joint, simply set your dado head to the new width, make a test cut, reset the I-Box to that cut and create your joints.

The Conventional Method Using a Shop-Made Jig

Step 1: Make a wooden miter gauge face. Be sure it's long enough to provide support for the sides of your planned project that are to be joined.

Step 2: Make a positioning pin. It must be EXACTLY the same width as your dado blade set-up . Make it about 2" to 2-1/2" long.

Step 3: Cut out plenty of test boards. You're going to need them during the set-up process! They should be the same thickness and width as your finished pieces.

Step 4: Adjust your dado blade set to the EXACT width of cut you desire. Attach the blade set to your table saw, along with the miter gauge face you made in Step #1 above.

Step 5: Make a test cut. If your test cut is not precise, remove the blade set from your table saw and add or subtract shims as required to achieve the exact cut width you want. Remember that the wider your mating workpieces are, the worse any width discrepancies will become as you progress through making your series of cuts.

Step 6: Repeat STEP 5 as many times as may be required to achieve the EXACT width of cut you desire. If your test cut is not precise, remove the blade set from your table saw and add or subtract shims as required to achieve the exact cut width you want. Note: This process may have to be repeated a few (or several) times to achieve the exact adjustment.

Step 7: Remove your miter gauge face from the gauge and cut a slot in it to accept the positioning pin. This slot MUST be located in the miter gauge face EXACTLY the same distance from the edge of your blade set as the blade set is wide. Glue the positioning pin into the slot of the miter gauge face.

Step 8: Cut two mating workpieces of the width you plan to use and create a test joint. If your test joint doesn't fit properly, there could be any number of reasons for this: (A) Your dado blade width could be set improperly. If so, remove the blade set from your saw, add or delete shims as required and replace. (B) The width of your positioning pin does not match the width of your dado blade set. If so, make a new positioning pin of the correct width. (C) The location of your positioning pin in your miter gauge face could be incorrect. If so, make a new miter gauge face and re-locate the positioning pin slot, as required.

Step 9: Repeat as many of the above steps as may be required to achieve an acceptable result.

Estimated amount of time required to complete the construction of the jig and the set-up process outlined above... from one to two hours.

To make a different size finger joint, it will be necessary for you to make another miter gauge face and another positioning pin... then reset and re-shim your dado blade set to the EXACT width you desire. Basically, go through all nine of the steps outlined above.

Order on the Web or by Phone, if you prefer -- 1-937-890-5197.

Call before 4:30 PM Eastern Time

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